Answer

Answer
Not a bug

The altitude for the Grand Canyon airspace refers to the special flight rules area as a whole.While there are sections within the area with different altitudes, the SFRA in it's entirety is 17,999' and below (see note as printed on a sectional chart).



Answer
Not a bug

The altitude for the Grand Canyon airspace refers to the special flight rules area as a whole.While there are sections within the area with different altitudes, the SFRA in it's entirety is 17,999' and below (see note as printed on a sectional chart).



Your answer is flat wrong. The Grand Canyon chart is regulatory, not the misleading note on the sectional. Why does your program not show the actual chart, just like a Class B area? 

If you check the Grand Canyon chart, which is unchanged from April 19, 2001(as of Sept 13, 2018 charts currency publication). The information on the sectional is only generic, not specific. Showing the altitude for the entire special flight rules area is VERY misleading...like showing an entire Class B as one altitude. The note is not what governs the airspace, the Grand Canyon chart is the regulatory document.
Each sector has its own altitude, and that is very important for piston non-turbocharged aircraft. Your charting shows a more than 100 mile roadblock that does not exist. Trying to flight plan and assure terrain and special flight rules clearance is not possible as charted for Phoenix - Salt Lake or any stop in southern Utah.
Kelly McMullen